Accord - Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent (policy brief)

Apr 2014
This 6-page policy brief summarises the findings of Accord 25 - Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent. It argues that a legitimacy lens should be applied to peace processes by paying attention to priorities of context, consent and change.

Reconciliation, reform and resilience: Positive peace for Lebanon (Accord 24) - English version

Jul 2012
Cover of Accord issue 24
Lebanon’s model of post-war power sharing and liberal economic growth has been widely praised. But it has failed to deliver for most Lebanese. Repeated outbreaks of political violence since the 1989 Taif Peace Agreement, and today fear of spillover from insecurity in Syria, show that a fundamentally different approach is needed to transform negative and precarious stability in Lebanon into positive and resilient peace.

UN-led mediation in Syria and civil society

Navigating inclusion in peace processes
Feb 2019
 
Marie-Joëlle Zahar and Sara Helmüller explore challenges of civil society inclusion in peace efforts in Syria. Armed conflict in Syria is multi-layered, involving a multiplicity of national actors and of regional and geopolitical interests. International narratives have exaggerated external actors’ influence, underplaying local agency and diversity.

Inclusion in peace processes

There is a broad global consensus that inclusion matters in peace processes. The 2018 UN and World Bank report, Pathways for Peace, asserts that ‘addressing inequalities and exclusion’ and ‘making institutions more inclusive’ are key to preventing violent conflict.

Accord - Navigating inclusion in peace processes

Mar 2019
Cover shot of Accord 28 navigating inclusion in peace processes
There is a broad global consensus that inclusion matters in peace processes. The 2018 UN and World Bank report, Pathways for Peace, asserts that ‘addressing inequalities and exclusion’ and ‘making institutions more inclusive’ are key to preventing violent conflict. The challenges now are to strengthen that consensus and to better understand what inclusion in peace processes means in practice. Effective peace processes do not mean including all of the people all of the time but making informed decisions about who should be included in what and how.

Syria

Administering a borderland at war: Bab al-Hawa in Syria
Nov 2018

 

Jerusalem

Creating margins at the centre: Israeli bypass roads in the Palestinian Beit Hanina neighbourhood, East Jerusalem
Nov 2018

 

Anwar Jaber reflects on transformation of East Jerusalem into an urban borderland that is both at the centre and the edge of contested space. The city’s urban fabric and built infrastructure offer key insights into  how a border that cuts through a city operates, as well as how it  continues to evolve due to the structures that maintain it.

 

Youth aspirations for peace and security

Jan 2018
Youth aspirations for peace and security
In December 2015, the United Nations Security Council adopted UNSCR 2250 on Youth, Peace and Security. The resolution was the first to recognise the important role young people can play in preventing conflicts, and sustaining peace. Conciliation Resources was invited by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) to contribute to the Progress Report on UNSCR 2250. Between July and September 2017, we conducted participatory research with 494 young people living in Afghanistan, Jammu and Kashmir, South Sudan, the Georgian-Abkhaz context, and among youth of the Ogaden diaspora living in the United Kingdom.

Five ways to support youth inclusion in peacebuilding

Young people who have experienced conflict firsthand have a vital role to play in peacebuilding. They have a clear vision of what peace could look like in their countries and communities, and have the drive to work towards the realisation of these goals. 
 
However, in many cases they are seen not as positive forces for peace, but rather as threats to it.

Reconciliation, reform and resilience: Positive peace for Lebanon (Accord 24) - Arabic version

Jul 2012

Lebanon’s model of post-war power sharing and liberal economic growth has been widely praised. But it has failed to deliver for most Lebanese. Repeated outbreaks of political violence since the 1989 Taif Peace Agreement, and today fear of spillover from insecurity in Syria, show that a fundamentally different approach is needed to transform negative and precarious stability in Lebanon into positive and resilient peace.