Reconciliation, reform and resilience: Positive peace for Lebanon (Accord 24) - English version

Jul 2012
Cover of Accord issue 24
Lebanon’s model of post-war power sharing and liberal economic growth has been widely praised. But it has failed to deliver for most Lebanese. Repeated outbreaks of political violence since the 1989 Taif Peace Agreement, and today fear of spillover from insecurity in Syria, show that a fundamentally different approach is needed to transform negative and precarious stability in Lebanon into positive and resilient peace.

Youth, peace and security: addressing the violence of exclusion

Navigating inclusion in peace processes
Mar 2019
 
Graeme Simpson’s article draws on his experience as the lead author of the report on youth, peace and security mandated by UN Security Council Resolution 2250 (2015). Simpson challenges what he calls the 'policy panic’, which erroneously associates youth with the threat of violence, and fails to recognise that the vast majority of young people reject the use of force.

Civil society inclusion in peacebuilding: who, how and so what?

Navigating inclusion in peace processes
Mar 2019
 
Jenny Aulin’s article draws on a recent consultation with over 170 local and international peacebuilding practitioners and academics, which asked ‘what is inclusion in peacebuilding?’ Findings suggest seeing inclusion three-dimensionally, as: 1) inclusive representation – who participates? 2) inclusive process – how do mechanisms to support inclusion work?

Inclusion in peace processes

There is a broad global consensus that inclusion matters in peace processes. The 2018 UN and World Bank report, Pathways for Peace, asserts that ‘addressing inequalities and exclusion’ and ‘making institutions more inclusive’ are key to preventing violent conflict.

Accord - Navigating inclusion in peace processes

Mar 2019
Cover shot of Accord 28 navigating inclusion in peace processes
There is a broad global consensus that inclusion matters in peace processes. The 2018 UN and World Bank report, Pathways for Peace, asserts that ‘addressing inequalities and exclusion’ and ‘making institutions more inclusive’ are key to preventing violent conflict. The challenges now are to strengthen that consensus and to better understand what inclusion in peace processes means in practice. Effective peace processes do not mean including all of the people all of the time but making informed decisions about who should be included in what and how.

Escaping back home: Badawiya's story

Badawiya lives in Yobe State northeast Nigeria. Since 2009, the Boko Haram insurgency has ravaged this region, leading to what the UN has called ‘the worst humanitarian crisis on the African continent.’

Coming home: life after the LRA

In 2016, Dieudonné was kidnapped by a group of armed men as he returned home from working the fields with his family. Along with twenty five other young people from his village, he was forced to march to the training camp of the notorious Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA).