Negotiations in a globalised world

Powers of persuasion: Incentives, sanctions and conditionality in peacemaking
Feb 2008
Accord Incentives: Negotiations in a globalised world
Arguing that the negotiations between the Sri Lankan government and the LTTE that began in 2002 must be understood less as a ‘peace process’ than as a part of the government’s strategic response to economic crisis, Sunil Bastian outlines the reason for their failure.

The Middle East Peace Process: The case for jaw-jaw not war-war

Powers of persuasion: Incentives, sanctions and conditionality in peacemaking
Feb 2008
Accord Incentives: The Middle East Peace Process
Michael Ancram reviews his experience in Northern Ireland and draws several lessons for the Middle East. He criticises the isolation of Hamas after they won Palestinian elections in 2006, and advocates exploratory dialogue as a way forward.

Aid as carrot, aid as stick: The politics of aid conditionality in the Palestinian Territories

Powers of persuasion: Incentives, sanctions and conditionality in peacemaking
Feb 2008
Accord Incentives: Aid as carrot, aid as stick
Rex Brynen reviews the different uses of aid as carrot and stick in the Palestinian territories from the 1990s to the present, arguing that that donor assistance and pressure cannot substitute for focused political engagement that addresses the key issues in dispute.

Sanctions and the path away from peace

Powers of persuasion: Incentives, sanctions and conditionality in peacemaking
Feb 2008
Accord Incentives: Sanctions and the path away from peace
In arguing that Georgia and other international actors have misjudged the consequences of the policy of isolating Abkhazia, Liana Kvarchelia describes the sanctions imposed, the effects of Russia's easing of restrictions, and the resulting changes in Abkhazian attitudes.

The isolation of Abkhazia: A failed policy or an opportunity?

Powers of persuasion: Incentives, sanctions and conditionality in peacemaking
Feb 2008
Accord Incentives: The isolation of Abkhazia
Archil Gegeshidze explores the Georgian government's strategy of isolating Abkhazia and discusses the possible ways out of the current limbo.

International interventions in Côte d'Ivoire: In search of a point of leverage

Powers of persuasion: Incentives, sanctions and conditionality in peacemaking
Feb 2008
International interventions in Côte d'Ivoire
Mike McGovern argues that the threat of international prosecution or the use of UN sanctions have achieved a certain success in limiting the damage of the war Côte d'Ivoire, but attempts to engineer a political solution via a series of peace accords and coercive Security Council resolutions have largely failed.

Sanctions and the political process for Darfur: An interview with Jan Eliasson

Powers of persuasion: Incentives, sanctions and conditionality in peacemaking
Feb 2008
Accord Incentives: Sanctions and the political process for Darfur
Special Envoy of the UN Secretary-General for Darfur Jan Eliasson discusses the pressure international actors have exerted on the Sudanese government and non-signatory armed groups in relation to efforts to resolve the Darfur conflict.

The role of the United Nations in the Angolan peace process

From military peace to social justice? The Angolan peace process.
Oct 2004
Manuel Paulo charts the changing roles of the UN in Angola and the problems it faced. He describes how the 2000 Fowler Report broke new ground enforcing sanctions and the lessons that can be learnt from the UN’s experiences.

Angola

Angola’s 26-year civil war ended in April 2002 with the signing of the Luena Memorandum of Understanding between the government and the Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA). Marking the end of the government’s campaign to achieve peace through war, the Luena Memorandum built on a series of previous failed peace agreements.

From military peace to social justice? The Angolan peace process

Oct 2004
From military peace to social justice? The Angolan peace process (Accord issue 15, 2004) asks ‘what next?’ for a nation that has secured a ‘military peace’ but still faces huge challenges in post-conflict peacebuilding and a secessionist war in Cabinda. It provides lessons from Angola’s history of conflict and peacemaking, and reviews past peace processes and the roles played by Angolan civil society, institutions such as the United Nations and foreign governments.