Post-2015: A Peacebuilder’s Perspective

Apr 2014
Post 2015 Peacebuilders Perspectives
Peace and security, the environment, development and human rights are intrinsically connected. Read our reflections on how violence reduction and the promotion of peace can truly be put at the heart of the post-2015 development framework.

Afghanistan post-2014: reverberations in Kashmir

Apr 2014
Afghanistan post-2014: reverberations in Kashmir
2014 is a pivotal year in Afghanistan with a major drawdown of US troops under way. This latest briefing paper considers the possible scenarios for neighbouring Kashmir. What are the implications for the already fragile Indian-Pakistani dialogue? And what impact will it have on intra-Kashmir peacebuilding initiatives? For more information on the background to the Kashmir conflict please see the previous brief in this series.

Measuring peacebuilding performance: why we need a "data revolution"

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Andrew Mack describes the extent of the current dearth in available data to realise “evidence-based” policymaking globally and to ascertain people’s perceptions of the local impact of peacebuilding initiatives.

Lebanon - Where next for Hezbollah: resistance or reform?

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Bassel Saloukh examines the evolution of Hezbollah in Lebanon – as a political and social actor that maintains significant independent military capability. Developments inside and outside Lebanon have influenced Hezbollah’s progression from an armed militia and revolutionary party to one of Lebanon’s principal domestic political actors.

Afghanistan - Local governance, national reconciliation and community reintegration

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Karim Merchant and Ghulam Rasoul Rasouli analyse attempts in Afghanistan to use Community Development Councils (CDCs) to roll out a national reintegration programme for ex-combatants at the local level. The CDCs’ main function is to implement the National Solidarity Program (NSP), established in 2003 as “the largest people’s project in the history of Afghanistan”.

Somalia: legitimacy of the Provisional Constitution

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Abdihakim Ainte examines the complexities of constitutional processes in Somalia, explaining how the allocation of decision-making responsibilities at key moments has undermined the legitimacy of the 2012 Provisional Constitution for many Somalis. The Provisional Constitution has a core peacebuilding function to define an acceptable social contract.

Yemen - National Dialogue Conference: managing peaceful change?

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Ali Hassan explains how the National Dialogue Conference in Yemen has tried to tackle drivers of conflict and respond to imperatives of social and political change. The conference has organised working groups to address specific topics such as self-determination for the south, transitional justice, and rights and freedoms.

Basque Country: experiences of the Social Forum to invigorate peace

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Paul Rios describes civil society efforts to initiate an “informal” national dialogue process for the Basque Country, specifically a Social Forum organised in March 2013 and a citizen’s network.

National dialogue and legitimate change

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Hannes Siebert explains how national dialogue processes seek to address entrenched and protracted conflict through constructing forums for political reform and constitutional change. National dialogues prioritise domestic ownership as the stakeholders determine the process, decision-making and implementation mechanisms.

Legitimacy and peace processes: international norms and local realities

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Jean Arnault explores the relationship between international norms and local realities in peace processes – in particular means to build domestic support. He discusses three specific ways that domestic legitimacy was built in the Guatemalan peace process: through the participation of key constituencies, the representation of significant views and values, and the delivery of tangible dividends.