School of Hospitality & Tourism Management (SHTM), University of Jammu

The School of Hospitality & Tourism Management (SHTM) at the University of Jammu offers training in tourism and business management, participates in government level debates to help formulate trade and tourism polices, and aims to facilitate economic development, peacebuilding and confidence building.  Conciliation Resources and SHTM work jointly on cross Line of Control tourism as a confidence building measure. SHTM is based on the Indian side of the Line of Control at the University of Jammu in Jammu & Kashmir. 

Pioneering Accord series released as ebooks

For the first time, all 25 editions of Conciliation Resources' Accord publications are now available to download as free e-books. Download your copies now!

Moving forward: The future of business in Mindanao

With the signing of the Mindanao peace agreement in March the demand for increased jobs and development is high. During a visit by an EU delegation local business community came together to discuss future economic development and expectations.

Letter: Effective targets to promote sustainable peace

Apr 2014
Open letter to UN's OWG on Sustainable Development Goals
To address the underlying drivers of conflict, our definition of peace needs to more than the absence of violence. Conciliation Resources and 32 other civil society groups have sent a joint letter to the UN’s Open Working Group (OWG) on Sustainable Development Goals addressing this and identifying effective targets to promote sustainable peace.

New publication explores legitimacy and peace processes

Legitimacy matters for peace. It defines the social and political deals between states and citizens, and local leaders and communities. The new edition of Accord focuses on legitimacy, and the ways that it can help build more equitable and sustainable peace.

Conclusion: from coercion to consent

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Accord 25 co-editors Achim Wennmann and Alexander Ramsbotham draw together insights and observations on peace processes and legitimacy, and distil lessons for peacebuilding policy and practice. They suggest the importance of applying a “legitimacy lens” to designing and implementing peace processes by paying attention to three priorities in approach.

Indonesia - Asia’s perestroika: regime change and transition from within

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Agus Wandi and Nezar Patria discuss Asian perestroika in Indonesia. Years of reformist mobilisation underpinned the collapse of President Suharto’s New Order dictatorship in 1998 – ultimately sparked by the Asian economic crisis.

El Salvador - Negotiating with gangs

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Isabel Aguilar Umaña, Bernardo Arévalo de León and Ana Glenda Táger discuss the truce between the two main gangs in El Salvador reached in March 2012. Levels of gang violence were comparable with war zones, with a rate of 66 homicides per 100,000 in 2011. Increasingly tough mano dura (iron fist) policies of criminal legislation proved counter-productive.

Transformation of coercive actors

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Veronique Dudouet argues that engaging different types of armed actor is an essential part of a peace process. Negotiations to end fighting also require that armed actors reconsider their reliance on coercion to achieve their objectives.

Afghanistan - Local governance, national reconciliation and community reintegration

Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent
Apr 2014

Karim Merchant and Ghulam Rasoul Rasouli analyse attempts in Afghanistan to use Community Development Councils (CDCs) to roll out a national reintegration programme for ex-combatants at the local level. The CDCs’ main function is to implement the National Solidarity Program (NSP), established in 2003 as “the largest people’s project in the history of Afghanistan”.