Accord - Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent (policy brief)

Apr 2014
This 6-page policy brief summarises the findings of Accord 25 - Legitimacy and peace processes: from coercion to consent. It argues that a legitimacy lens should be applied to peace processes by paying attention to priorities of context, consent and change.

UN-led mediation in Syria and civil society

Navigating inclusion in peace processes
Feb 2019
 
Marie-Joëlle Zahar and Sara Helmüller explore challenges of civil society inclusion in peace efforts in Syria. Armed conflict in Syria is multi-layered, involving a multiplicity of national actors and of regional and geopolitical interests. International narratives have exaggerated external actors’ influence, underplaying local agency and diversity.

Inclusion in peace processes

There is a broad global consensus that inclusion matters in peace processes. The 2018 UN and World Bank report, Pathways for Peace, asserts that ‘addressing inequalities and exclusion’ and ‘making institutions more inclusive’ are key to preventing violent conflict.

Accord - Navigating inclusion in peace processes

Mar 2019
Cover shot of Accord 28 navigating inclusion in peace processes
There is a broad global consensus that inclusion matters in peace processes. The 2018 UN and World Bank report, Pathways for Peace, asserts that ‘addressing inequalities and exclusion’ and ‘making institutions more inclusive’ are key to preventing violent conflict. The challenges now are to strengthen that consensus and to better understand what inclusion in peace processes means in practice. Effective peace processes do not mean including all of the people all of the time but making informed decisions about who should be included in what and how.

Syria - Civilian interaction with armed groups in the Syrian conflict

In the midst of violence: local engagement with armed groups
May 2015

A case study examining the effectiveness of community-based initiatives to engage in dialogue with armed groups in rebel-controlled Syria, a fluid environment with high levels of insecurity and violence. Wisam Elhamoui and Sinan al‑Hawat describe how a number of communities living in these areas have organised informally to facilitate relief operations and broader social welfare.

Sinan al-Hawat

Sinan al-Hawat is a London-based researcher specialising in complex emergencies and humanitarian aid. He holds an MSc in Development Management from the London School of Economics and Political Science, as well as a postgraduate degree in Islamic Studies and Humanities from the Institute of Ismaili Studies, London. 

Wisam Elhamoui

Wisam Elhamoui is a Syrian civil society activist focusing on emergency practice and conflict transformation. He is currently working in Gaziantep, Turkey, on a project to empower local emerging governance structures in non-regime held areas of Syria. He holds an MA in Development and Emergency Practice. He has written and contributed to research on the Syrian crisis, with a focus on ceasefires and conflict prevention.

Expert analysis: between fighting and talking

In the midst of violence: local engagement with armed groups
May 2015

Governments and the international community remain reluctant to allow space for dialogue with non-state armed groups and have a limited understanding of how to reach and influence them constructively. Yet whilst international policy remains ambiguous, local populations living alongside armed groups may already be in contact.

In the midst of violence: local engagement with armed groups

In the midst of violence: local engagement with armed groups
May 2015

Zahbia Yousuf introduces the publication's three in-depth case studies from Colombia, northern Uganda and Syria, as well as a shorter reflection from Northern Ireland.

Foreword

In the midst of violence: local engagement with armed groups
May 2015
Michael Semple introduces the publication and affirms that formal peacemaking can learn much from the experiences of local communities' engagement with armed groups.