Working for justice: Visaka Dharmadasa

Visaka Dharmadasa is a member of the Women Mediators across the Commonwealth network, and Chair of the Association of War Affected Women and Parents of Servicemen Missing in Action. Through her involvement in WMC she is connecting with, and learning from, women mediators across the world and taking part in joint promotion and advocacy initiatives with other members.

Workshop report: mechanisms for political participation of the public in peacemaking

Feb 2002
This report from a joint analysis workshop on mechanisms for political participation of the public in the peace processes in Colombia, Guatemala, Mali, Northern Ireland, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Somalia, and South Africa summarises the discussions that took place and describes key issues and examples from specific experiences.

Engaging armed groups - Joint analysis workshop report

Dec 2007
This report on the engaging armed groups in peace processes workshop, hosted by Conciliation Resources in July 2004 presents a series of recommendations based on principles emerging from the workshop discussions.

Engaging armed groups in peace processes - Sri Lanka primer

Jul 2004
This document is intended as a simple overview of Sri Lanka, produced for the Accord Programme workshop on ‘Engaging armed groups in peace processes’, London, July 2004.

Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies

The Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies (CPCS) is home to a range of interconnected programmes that promote the advancement of peace processes, research and learning. CPCS creates opportunities for practitioners, students, academics and analysts to access information and resources that are contextually grounded; and supports people in country and conflict situations through network support mechanisms and consultancy services.

Asymmetries in the peace process: The Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam

Choosing to engage: Armed groups and peace processes
May 2005
Accord Armed Groups: The Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam
LTTE advisor Rudrakumaran argues that the international climate in which negotiations take place is biased in favour of states. Anti-terrorist legislation has erected artificial power asymmetries, limiting the LTTE’s involvement in peace talks.

Choosing to engage: Armed groups and peace processes

May 2005
Accord Armed Groups: Cover image
Accord issue 16 explores the case for engagement with armed groups and the lessons learned from peacemaking practice. Highlighting both opportunities and challenges, it suggests that the range of engagement options and potential interveners makes a strong case for engagement.

Engaging armed groups

Non-state armed groups are central figures in internal armed conflicts.  Their objectives and use of violence spark controversy about appropriate responses to their action, particularly in the context of the ‘war on terror’. Yet over the past two decades, armed groups have taken part in peace processes on every continent, resulting in many experiences of dialogue and peace negotiations.

International support for peace: Too much to ask?

Powers of persuasion: Incentives, sanctions and conditionality in peacemaking
Feb 2008
Accord Incentives: International support for peace
Debates on how international conditionalities or incentives have supported or undermined peacebuilding in Sri Lanka fail to ask whether they have even been seriously tried. Brian Smith reviews the failure to implement the aid conditionalities of the 2003 Tokyo Conference.

Prejudice, asymmetry and insecurity

Powers of persuasion: Incentives, sanctions and conditionality in peacemaking
Feb 2008
Accord Incentives: Prejudice, asymmetry and insecurity
Suthaharan Nadarajah discusses the Sri Lankan peace process from 2002 and concludes that international action served to tilt the strategic balance in favour of the state rather than ensuring the parties addressed the underlying causes of conflict.